Functioning At Work After A Personal Tragedy

Experiencing a personal tragedy is incredibly hard.  

And it’s challenging to deal with while still having to be a leader at work. 

People are depending on you, but you still dealing with personal pain. 

You want to grieve but you also want to be available for everybody at work. 

It’s a difficult challenge that many of us never find a way to balance. 

Sometimes we become more focused on work that dealing with our tragedies. 

This can cost us in our personal lives. 

Sometimes we do the complete opposite and drop everything to only focus on our personal life. 

Over time, this will lead people to believe we are not committed to work. 

So, what do you do when personal issues can potentially impact your work? 

Take care of you first. 

Before you worry about your job, take care of yourself. 

You’re only as good as you are good to yourself. 

Don’t drive yourself into craziness because you’re dealing with this stress. 

Take the time you need to deal with your personal tragedy. 

This is why you are given bereavement leave. 

If you don’t have bereavement leave, shame on your place of work. 

You shouldn’t want to work for any organization that makes you feel bad for taking time to take care of yourself. 

They’re showing you that they don’t care about you. 

No one deserves to work for a leader that doesn’t care about them. 

So, focus on yourself

Give yourself a chance to get yourself together and to grieve. 

It’s the most important thing you can do. 

Anton

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