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How To Build Culture With A Remote Team

How To Build Culture With A Remote Team

Culture is very important in every organization. 

Whether you work in a small office or have 10,000 employees, culture can be difficult to build. 

When you have a team working remotely, it can get even more difficult to build.  

People may do their own thing and stray from the mission, vision, and values that you’ve created.  

There may be a bad leader in a unit that can cause a toxic environment. 

These things do not aide in building a world class culture.  

Every day, leaders are facing the difficult challenge of leading a remote team. 

Could you imagine how complex this gets when there’s a healthcare crisis, a pandemic or a recession? 

When people cannot be in the places they’d normally be, it’s difficult to build a good culture. 

Here are a couple of things you can do to begin building culture with your remote team. 

1. Talk to your people 

If you can’t see your people, you’ve got to talk to them. 

Set up a daily and/or weekly infrastructure where you gather together. 

It could be a conference call but preferably it should be a video. 

This call should have a very short script from you, but a long script from your team.  

The short script from you is to remind people why the team has these meetings; to build culture, share information and to provide understanding amongst everyone on the team. 

Then you’ll want to have people contribute to remote conversation. 

You can ask questions like, “What’s the best thing that happened to you yesterday?” or “What’s one challenge that you had to overcome yesterday?” 

There needs to be a daily routine of contact with your team. 

This is how you’re going to build culture. 

2. Invest in your team 

Invest in your team by creating an environment where everybody is learning every day. 

Invest in opportunities and apparatuses that make sure your team is getting new information, new tools, and new resources. 

Everyone loves to grow.  

If you provide your team with the nourishment to learn and to grow, they’ll want to stay plugged in and engaged.  

This builds a culture of connectivity and learning that leads to a culture of engagement.  

The best leaders in the best organizations build a good remote culture by adding value to each person on the team. 

Make sure they learn, grow and that they’re contributors to their environment. 

These are ways to being building a great culture with your remote team. 

Anton

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